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WAS OUR NATION'S INDEPENDENCE BASED ON A FALSE FLAG?

James Perloff, author of the article ‘The Secrets Buried at Lexington Green writes, “I grew up in Lexington, Massachusetts, where on April 19, 1775, a force of British redcoats, on their way to Concord to confiscate rebel munitions, encountered a small force of militiamen. Suddenly, "the shot heard round the world" was fired. In the ensuing skirmish, eight colonists were killed, and nine wounded. The British suffered one wounded. This was a causus bellum for the American Revolution.
But, was "the shot heard round the world" a false flag like 9-11, a pretext for war?

As explained in detail my online article The Secrets Buried at Lexington Green, Americans were deceived. It was proclaimed everywhere that the British had committed an unprovoked massacre in Lexington. The truth is individuals in concealed locations fired on the British first.”


Perloff goes into more detail stating that Samuel Adams secured a pledge from the delegates of the 1774 Philadelphia Congress stipulating that if one colony was attacked , the other colonies would aid in their defense, however; the delegates insisted on one stipulation and that stipulation was that the pledge would only be honored IF the British fired the first shots. Perloff also notes that British veterans who were at the battle recorded in personal diaries (not intended for publication that the Americans fired first and if a good conspiracy wets your whistle, Perloff presents the following:

“The night before the battle, Joseph Warren dispatched Paul Revere on his famous ride from Boston. Warren sent another rider, William Dawes, and both arrived at the Lexington house where John Hancock (left) and Samuel Adams--leaders of the revolution in Massachusetts---were staying. Adams had recruited smuggler John Hancock, wealthiest man in Massachusetts, to be the revolution's financial angel.

What history books omit: Warren was Grand Master of St. Andrew's Free Masonic Lodge in Boston; Revere, Dawes and Hancock belonged to that Lodge. After the war, Revere became Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.”

Evidence found in the Library of Congress backs up Perloff’s claim that the Americans fired first at Lexington. The Library of Congress archive of the Atlantic Monthly (Volume 39, Issue 234, April 1877) contains diary entries from a British Army Officer who wrote:

“[April 1775] Last night between 10 and 11 o'clock all the Grenadiers and Light Infantry of the Army, making about 600 Men, (under the command of Lt. Coll. Smith of the 10th and Major Pitcairn of the Marines), embarked and were landed upon the opposite shore on Cambridge Marsh; few but the Commandg. Officers knew what expedition we were going upon. After getting over the Marsh, where we were wet up to the knees, we were halted in a dirty road and stood there 'till two o'clock in the morning, waiting for provisions to be brought from the boats and to be divided, and which most of the Men threw away, having carried some with 'em. At 2 o'clock we began our March by wading through a very long ford up to our Middles: after going a few miles we took 3 or 4 People who were going off to give intelligence; about 5 miles on this side of a Town called Lexington, which lay in our road, we heard there were some hundreds of People collected together intending to oppose us and stop our going on; at 5 o'clock we arrived there and saw a number of People, I believe between 2 and 300, formed in a Common in the middle of the Town; we still continued advancing, keeping prepared against an attack tho' without intending to attack them; but on our coming near them they fired one or two shots, upon which our Men without any orders rushed in upon them, fired and put 'em to flight; several of them were killed, we cou'd not tell how many, because they were got behind Walls and into the Woods; We had a Man of the 10th light Infantry wounded, nobody else hurt.”

These and many other interesting questions will be answered in my upcoming book "A Beginner's Guide to False Flags".


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